Service cost and what is involved in a CW service

Discuss Christopher Ward watches
MarkingTime
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Re: Service cost and what is involved in a CW service

Post by MarkingTime »

Although £150 might seem like a bit of a bargain for the amount of work involved in a full strip, clean, inspect and rebuild, servicing of these movements generally only makes financial sense if you do it yourself.

NB: Punters price for a SW200-1 is around £150, much less for a manufacturer or watchmaker to purchase, especially in bulk.

DavecUK
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Re: Service cost and what is involved in a CW service

Post by DavecUK »

MarkingTime wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:23 am
Although £150 might seem like a bit of a bargain for the amount of work involved in a full strip, clean, inspect and rebuild, servicing of these movements generally only makes financial sense if you do it yourself.

NB: Punters price for a SW200-1 is around £150, much less for a manufacturer or watchmaker to purchase, especially in bulk.
Agreed, which is why it ticks me off that CWW would rather muck around with 2-3 month service turnarounds rather than simply recase a new movement.

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A1soknownas
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Re: Service cost and what is involved in a CW service

Post by A1soknownas »

DavecUK wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:21 pm
MarkingTime wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 1:23 am
Although £150 might seem like a bit of a bargain for the amount of work involved in a full strip, clean, inspect and rebuild, servicing of these movements generally only makes financial sense if you do it yourself.

NB: Punters price for a SW200-1 is around £150, much less for a manufacturer or watchmaker to purchase, especially in bulk.
Agreed, which is why it ticks me off that CWW would rather muck around with 2-3 month service turnarounds rather than simply recase a new movement.
I think it is a tricky decision to make and there is a wider impact to consider beyond the economics of a time/cost equation.
What they do with an individual watch when they service it is down to them and as long as we receive a perfect unit back in a reasonable time that is what matters so the key to me would be appropriate timescales and sufficient staff to enable this.

As a brand their first solution for a service across all models should be to do just that and not to simply exchange the movement and get it out of the door as quick possible. It appears that they are aiming for a higher level of perceived brand/watchmaker and for their watches to be seen as an investment piece (remember the next generation advert business from Loupe...). Not every part of the scenario at the moment supports this aim and lots may need to be tweaked to get there such as staff resources, improvements in operations/logistics, price point and indeed looking at the movements selected but to just exchange the heart of the watch as a standard approach would probably take them backwards in this journey rather than towards where they would eventually like to be.

Despite this, I too don't want to wait 2-3 months though! :D

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