Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Straps, straps, straps, and bracelets!
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Dancematt
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Dancematt »

UNless im mistaken, that must be a very rare dial indeed! looks great, where was the deployement from if you dont mind FT?
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by FieryTowse »

Dancematt wrote:UNless im mistaken, that must be a very rare dial indeed! looks great, where was the deployement from if you dont mind FT?
Considering I've been looking for a good number of years and never come across another, then I'd have to agree with you.

I bought the deployment from an eBay seller called sectime. It's a 14mm polished stainless steel butterfly deployment clasp and being 14mm it's quite small and light but seems reasonably robust. I'd buy from them again, and they've got a couple of NATOs I'm keeping an eye on for when I buy something that they'd suit.
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Dancematt »

Thanks, i've never seen one like it either, incredible find....i can understand the obvious numerals but the extra lume dots are a very cool addition. The case would look nice refinished FT but can understand if you dont want to do that.

Everytime i put mine on the wrist it looks very wierd then it just grows on me and i have to wear it for at least 4 days which is somewhat unheard of in my rotation.
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by FieryTowse »

Dancematt wrote:The case would look nice refinished
For now it's enough to have had it serviced, re-strapped and the scuffs polished out of the acrylic crystal. I've promised myself that one day I'll get a full restoration done on it. I'm used to the little scuffs on the case and quite attached to the little patches of wear on either side of the crown caused by years of hand winding.
C3SKK/SKS
C11 KVKT
Omega Geneve Dynamic 135.0033 manual wind
Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 231.10.42.21.02.003
Omega Seamaster 300 Master Co-Axial 233.30.41.21.01.001
Steinhart Ocean Two
Rolex GMT-Master II 126710BLNR
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Dancematt »

Retro watches is now auctioning its NOS Omega dynamic bracelets on ebay as opposed to B.I.N - just aquired one, saved 20 quid on shop price, still expensive but i just had to see what it might look like on my 135.0033 - should be here by monday :D :D

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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Dancematt »

Also found this excellent write up on the history of Dynamics:

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Beginnings

http://www.antiquewatchcouk.com/petespa ... 010411.jpg

In 1967, the Omega Genève Dynamic was heralded as one of the world’s first ‘concept’ watch collections. It was a child of Omega’s glory days and exemplified the progressive design culture at Omega in the 1960s, a culture that had gained a strong foothold after the success of Gerald Genta’s 1964 Constellation C-Shape.

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In the 1960s, Omega Sales Director, Robert Forster, Pierre Moinat, Head of the Creations Department, along with designers such as Gilbert Albert and Raymond Thevanaz, were remarkable in their anticipation and leadership of consumer trends and preferences in watch design. During this period, a number of design firsts were registered by Omega. From the patented integrated bracelet models to the fashion-oriented collections under the Genève banner and then beyond to a fabulous array of jewellery watches, Omega was in the front line of the design revolution of the 1960s.

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Conceived by Robert Forster and designed by Raymond Thevanaz in 1967, the Omega Dynamic was one of the early explorations of the wristwatch as an ‘emotional’ and ‘image-enhancing’ entity, a piece of male jewellery that went beyond simple time-telling to make various statements about its owner. This notion of objects having a significant role in the projection of human identity had been around since the days of Carl Gustav Jung, but the Swiss watch industry was slow on appreciating the marketing opportunities offered by product-identity association.

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Whether aware of Jungian theory or not, Forster’s and Thevenez’s conceptual thinking behind the Dynamic was of the watch as an adjunct to, and statement about, the personality and modernity of the wearer. Later, Nicholas Hayek took this idea to extraordinary lengths with the Swatch phenomenon. It’s worth noting that changes in the design culture at Omega became more entrenched as the tenure of Creations Chief, Pierre Moinat, progressed. There was a real “buzz” in the Creations Department - an energy and excitement brought about by what was happening in the world and the boundless opportunities offered in the field of watch design.

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The old hypotheses around design playing second fiddle to precision and quality were overturned by a new rationale that elevated sculpture and appearance as equal partners to quality and horological excellence. While advertising was slightly more subtle in the 1960s, The Genève Dynamic was positioned as the perfect to those young moderns with
disposable income who were desirous of a quality alternative to the junk fashion watches of the time.

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The fashion models used to promote the line were on the more upmarket and stylish side: the men had deep tans and lots of bone structure while the women were so layered with cosmetics and eye liners they probably had to sit down frequently to take the weight off their make-up! But, they epitomised the product positioning of the watch, and in the early 1970s the Dynamic became Omega’s number one selling watch.

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Dynamic Design

While steeped in the design narratives of the time, the Dynamic does not look out of place today as a fashion watch. It has enduring lines and textures that possess a timeless appeal. As alluded to earlier, the design culture at Omega was the perfect medium for innovation in watch design, and the Dynamic represents a significant and indeed successful attempt to advance both the design and functionality of the wristwatch.

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The elliptical shape of the case emerged from a serious exploration of the anatomy of the wrist and how the styloideus ulnae causes a wristwatch to not sit firmly into the wrist. Computers were used to create an ‘ergonomic’ dial with concentric time zones for easy reading of the hour, minutes and seconds, made even more effortless by the use of colour contrasted hands. The case was ‘monocoque’, or one-piece, eliminating a major cause of moisture incursion - that of faulty caseback seals. The crown and crystal were hermetically sealed allowing water resistance to 30 metres. The crown was chased into the body so as to not break the aero-“dynamic” lines of the case, which, incidentally, was the inspiration for the name of the collection.

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To produce the original cases, Omega worked with Fernando Fontana at the Lascor Case Factory in Sesto Calende, a town located in the province of Varese in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. Omega often turned to Fontana for quality case work and later commissioned Gerald Genta to work with Fontana on the case design and production for the first Louis Brand series in 1984.

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The movement was accessed by applying force to and separating the crown end of a two-piece crown stem, as shown opposite. A special tool (107) removed the crystal. The dial and movement were rotated 30 degrees anti-clockwise, and by up-ending the case, the movement would fall out. The case design also incorporated an innovative approach to securing the watch band by the fashioning of a circular groove in which to sit the strap or bracelet and securing
the band with a steel screw-in ring. This allowed a quick change between the strap and stainless steel bracelet. A plastic key came with the Dynamic kit to screw or unscrew the ring.

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Further evidence of the imagination invested in the design of this watch was the corfam strap. Made of a porous synthetic material, it was punched with 30 aerating holes to allow the wrist to breathe, and was widened near the watch head to facilitate a very snug attachment to the wrist. When first released, the Genève Dynamic was available in twenty-four colour combinations on the dial, supported by twelve different straps, including black, deep royal blue, rich red, camel, beige and powder blue. Brushed stainless steel and gold plate bracelet ensembles were available at point of sale as optional extras.

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In 1969, the Omega Dynamic was awarded a prize by the jury of the first biannual Swiss industrial design competition against 250 competitors.

Case Styles

There are two distinct case styles for the Omega Dynamic 1 collection. The first and most collectible style encased movements 552, 565, 601, 613 and 752. The upper case finish in these models is that of a “radial adoucissage”, a quite deeply grained sunburst finish that radiates from an imaginary centre point. The case edges are very sharply defined with the case sides having a vertically applied deep grained, or adoucissage, finish. From an Omega brochure demonstrating the procedure for changing the watch strap.

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In collecting first generation Dynamics, it is important to source examples with cases that retain their original finish, because a large part of both the charm and collectibility of these watches is connected to original finish and sharpness of line. Examples where the case finish has been obliterated and the edges rounded through wear or polishing must be heavily discounted, or perhaps avoided, by the astute collector.The case back was of a linear adoucissage
(graining or softening) finish, and the ring was a radial grained finish. Always stamped at 6 o’clock were the words “Tool 107” and “Waterproof” as shown opposite. Notice also where the gold plating ends The second generation of Dynamic 1 cases were powered by calibres 1481, 1012 and 1022. As shown below right, the case was still of the elliptical shape, but highly polished. The chasing for the crown was not as severe and the case lacked the sharp demarcation lines of the original series. They have their own charm and quite a following.


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In 1971, Omega began slowly to integrate the Dynamic range into the De Ville collection and this, in hindsight, has created a problem for collectors of these later models because of the interchangeability of theelliptical case. Supplies of replacement cases, dials and hands for both the De Ville and Geneve versions are still available, and unscrupulous
watchmakers (particularly in Asia and the U.S.) are sourcing used 10xx series movements from worn out old bangers,
coupling them with new case/dial/hands ensembles and selling them as ‘New Old Stock’

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Many of the so-called NOS second generation dynamic models on eBay are of this ilk, and so it behoves buyers to insist on detailed pictures of the inner case and movement to ensure that the movement is as pristine as the case. Wear marks on the rotor, burred screws, discolouring of the copper/beryllium plating on the movement and signs of rust on the steel parts of the movements are reliable indicators of the work of a Frankenmeister.

As a rule of thumb, if these so-called New Old Stock models do not have box, strap key and papers, it best to avoid purchasing them. Arguably, if there were a genuine cache of NOS models, the likelihood of guarantee certificates, handbooks, strap keys and tags would be high, because they were part of the inventory of each single delivery of the watch.

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One of the more uncommon Dynamic 1 second generation models was case 166.0187. Powered by a calibre 1012, it had a rounded square case with a key-bolt compressor case back. Available in both stainless steel and gold plated versions, fewer of these models were produced. While a bona-fide member of the collection, they do not have the sculptural allure of the elliptical models and pay only lip service to Dynamic concept. As mentioned earlier, the De Ville name came to beassociated with the Dynamic in some of the later iterations of the collection, before the name Dynamic was dropped altogether and further models introduced wore the De Ville livery. Bearing the case numbers 166.0144 (elliptical), 166.0145 (cambered square) and 166.1046 (circular), these models, are also often paraded as NOS on eBay and, again, extreme caution is recommended because of their frankenwatch potential. The De Ville models were a study in minimalism, a worldwide reaction against some of the more excessively kitsch design fads seen in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

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The cases were highly polished and the dials lacked the character and novelty of the early Dynamic range. Often, the de Ville models are touted quite erroneously as ‘rare’, when, in truth, they do not conform to any reasonable definition of rarity, set apart as they are from the original design concept Dials.

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During the life of the Dynamic 1, many different colours and types of dials were available, too many to feature in this essay. The collection began with the signature computer-generated ‘ergonomic’ dials and expanded to include deluxe dials with applied Omega symbol and faceted markers, adding a premium to the retail price.The most admired and sought-after dials are those featured in the earliest of the Dynamic collections. They represent the ‘purity’ of the
Dynamic concept, very much like the first model of a motor car series that goes on to become a classic. “The bulls-eye” dials appear to have a special place in the heart of collectors, the royal blue version with brush silvered inner ring starring in many advertisements of the time.

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As the earliest Dynamics are more than forty years old, refinished dials are now a matter of course. As with other vintage watches, refinished dials may discount the value of the watch by up to thirty percent. The easiest way in which to determine dial originality is through the examination of the Omega script and a close examination of the Geneve Dynamic lettering. The uppercase script on the dial is the standard for the period. The fully rounded O, the double chevron M, a ‘G’ that appears almost circular in shape and the pointed ‘A’ in Omega are good indications of authenticity. Flat top ‘A’ letters in the automatic script, along with the fully circular ‘O’ and a ‘C’ that looks like a broken ‘O” are the means in which to confirm script originality. In examining the Geneve and Dynamic lettering, the G is identical to the Omega script, the e letters could be joined to form a circle and the accent above the ‘e’ is equidistantly placed. The Dynamic lettering has serif font, particularly on the ‘Y’, ‘N’, ‘A’., ‘M’ and ‘I’. The script is also finely printed and is not thick as is seen in many refinished dials.

There are some rules of thumb that may be applied to hands, although there are exceptions to the rule. (1) Blue sweeps will always appear on dark and light blue with contrasting silver dials and also dark blue metallic dials. (2) Red sweeps will appear on charcoal coloured dials and often on white and Grand Prix dials. (3) White sweeps will appear with darker two tone dials such as grey and gold and grey and white, maroon and white, etc. Generally, hour and minute hands will be white, however on some metallic dials the hands will be the same metal as the case, e.g. gold plate cases with metallic gold and grey dials. Black skeletonised hands are often combined with white and lighter dials.

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One of the rarest Dynamics is the 6165B/6196, a date only model powered by the 17 jewel calibre 560, of which it is believed less than 300 pieces were made
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Dancematt »

FieryTowse wrote:Finally back in working order, but still on an old black strap until I get home:

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Sent from my HTC Desire S using Tapatalk 2
Also i believe this information relates to Fiery's Dynamic:

MOVEMENT Calibre
number: 601 manual
winding
17 jewels. International
Collection : 1968-1971
DIAL Different
styles available,
with luminous
hands. Rivetted
markers optional

CRYSTAL
Armoured
hesalite
BRACELET
SS bracelet
1153/138
WATER RES
30 meters
CASE Stainless steel Unishell

Seems that a rivetted dial could be order from the factory and perhaps certain dealers?
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

Crikey, DM, that post was a labour of love...well done, excellent research!

A bit of publicity for these FANTASTIC watches is no bad thing!
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Kip »

What a great post Dancematt! Thanks so much for the history lesson. :thumbup:
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

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Kip wrote:What a great post Dancematt! Thanks so much for the history lesson. :thumbup:
Amor Vincit Omnia wrote:Crikey, DM, that post was a labour of love...well done, excellent research!

A bit of publicity for these FANTASTIC watches is no bad thing!
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Cheers guys, im not sure who the original author was but much respect to him for his research, it did take me a while to edit it together but certainly a very good read :thumbup: .......makes me want another :lol: , highly underrated.
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

Dancematt wrote: .......makes me want another :lol: , highly underrated.
:shh: :shh: :shh: :shh: :shh: :shh:
Quiet, or they'll all want one, and there'll be a global hyperinflation of Dynamic prices! :lol:
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

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Just to top it off, some words from the omega meseum:
First created for the Prix de Ville de Geneve in 1965 the line was launched to the public in 1968, the Dynamic line lived up to its name. The elliptical case shape was conceived to work with the anatomy of the wrist. The crown was integrated into the case so that it would not disturb the fairly aerodynamic flow of the line of the watch. The design of the dial was consistent with the clean functional aspects of the watch.

The straps, made in one piece from a porous synthetic material called Corfam, had “breathing holes” and were widened near the case for a secure hold on the wrist. A watch’s owner could easily change the Corfam straps and metal bracelets with a key that came with the watch. In fact this watch was such a success that more than 1,000,000 examples would be sold between 1968 and 1972.

In 1984, Omega launched the second generation of the Dynamic. They also featured interchangeable straps and had a case and dial that were angled up, in the words of an advertisement of the day, “for time-reading convenience, off-centered for the pleasure of owning a watch unlike any other.”

A final generation Omega Dynamic was presented in 1997. It was inspired by the aesthetics of the watches delivered to the British forces during World War II. The 1997 Dynamic line was intended to appeal to younger Omega buyers and was available in two versions: standard with a central seconds and or as a chronograph. They were presented on brown, yellow or red leather straps or a stainless steel bracelet.

The Omega Dynamic line appeared in catalogues in three different decades. Each generation was designed to attract new young customers to the brand and the first two generations in particular more than achieved that goal
Cetainly a fun watch missing in Omegas current catalogue.
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by f1colin »

These are truly excellent watches - indeed this post from FT inspired me to go digging and collecting Omega vintage and I now have 4 Dynamis in several variants although his dial is a rare beastie indeed. They are still bargains at around £300-£350 for very good ones and I cant help thinking that they will be a sound investment over time with such a retro cool shape and dial colours - notably the bullseye dial.
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

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f1colin wrote:These are truly excellent watches - indeed this post from FT inspired me to go digging and collecting Omega vintage and I now have 4 Dynamis in several variants although his dial is a rare beastie indeed. They are still bargains at around £300-£350 for very good ones and I cant help thinking that they will be a sound investment over time with such a retro cool shape and dial colours - notably the bullseye dial.
You mean you have 4 dynamics and you havent shown us? :****:
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Re: Sourcing an Omega Geneve Dynamic strap

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

What he said! :shock:
We'd love to see then, Colin, and don't forget to add them to the "Vintage Gallery"
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