11 Difficult English Accents

Here you can post stuff that is not related to Christopher Ward
User avatar
gwells
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 7626
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 4:02 am
CW-watches: 1
Location: falls church, va

11 Difficult English Accents

Post by gwells »

These users thanked the author gwells for the post:
jkbarnes
the "g" is for Greg...
User avatar
jkbarnes
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 7822
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:39 pm
CW-watches: 3
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by jkbarnes »

I watched this very video just two days ago! It’s pretty fascinating.
Drew
JAFO
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 4411
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:59 pm

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by JAFO »

I watched that the other day. I didn't count how many I got, but I caught a few. You couldn't really get Liberian though, could you, although I caught a few words there.

I felt the clips weren't long enough to get attuned to the sound, and with a bit more time I would have picked a bit more. It's hard to distinguish between Caribbean accents.

A long while ago I was in a pub in Ipswich, and I'm sure some locals were speaking English, but I couldn't pick up a word of what they were saying.
These users thanked the author JAFO for the post:
scooter
User avatar
missF
CW Forum Poet Laureate
CW Forum Poet Laureate
Posts: 11701
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:59 pm
CW-watches: 3
Location: Edinburgh

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by missF »

Really enjoyed that :D
I can listen to a conversation outside my front door and not understand it, but there’s two things happening - dialect and speed. Dialect I can understand but speed gets me - my brain processing speed is slow. I’m sure there are definitions that separate dialects from true languages but it seems very complex and blurred!
User avatar
Amor Vincit Omnia
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 33604
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2011 7:34 pm
CW-watches: 4
Location: Norfolk, UK

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

I can’t help wishing he had looked at the Potteries dialect, which I grew up with thanks mainly to my grandfather. You can hear the accent if you listen to someone like Garth Crooks or Robbie Williams, but the dialect (dying out somewhat these days) is quite impenetrable. It has elements of Shakespearean English and workplace slang from the pottery industry.

“Adoo” - sounds as though it might mean I do, but in fact it means hello (how-do?)

“Ah rat?” - not an insult or something one might say on seeing a large rodent scuttling down the back alley (backsies). It means: how are you? (How art?)

“A tow rate?” - how much will you charge to remove a broken down car? No, it means: are you alright?

“Again the woe” - a reference to yet more misery? No, it means: next to the wall.

“Ass turd a bite?” - shall we have a quick snack of donkey droppings? No, it means: have you heard about?

Don’t, shan’t, won’t, and can’t are respectively rendered as dunner, shonner, wunner and conner. Take into account that vowel sounds are sometimes the opposite of what you expect (a sort of Great Vowel Shift in Reverse), so “Dunner see nowt” means “Don’t say anything” and “Conner say nowt” means “I can’t see anything”.
These users thanked the author Amor Vincit Omnia for the post:
NigelS
Steve
Linguist; retired teacher; pilgrim; apprentice travel writer

Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints, kill nothing but time


Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. (Max Ehrmann)
User avatar
tikkathree
Trusted Seller
Trusted Seller
Posts: 7225
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 12:21 am
CW-watches: 1
Location: East Anglia - arr 'aas right buh

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by tikkathree »

"Everybody has accent - what kind of stupid question was that?"

Fascinating insight.
These users thanked the author tikkathree for the post:
ajax87
C60 MKI, MKII, MKIII: "some",
C6 & C60 Kingfishers,
C600 Tritechs,
C63 "some",
C65 "some",
C4, C40, C8, C9, C3, C5, C20FLE
Some other brands
User avatar
ajax87
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 3388
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:47 am
CW-watches: 6
Location: West Michigan, USA

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by ajax87 »

This is great! I love accents.

I love thinking about strange accent possibilities and trying to search them out. For example, what if a native Japanese speaker learned their english from someone who has lived their whole life in Dublin, or Cape Town? What would english spoken in those accents tinged with Japanese sound like? Well I couldn't find that, but I did find someone speaking Japanese with a Scottish accent. So there you go. https://fb.watch/mkFNU_crZG/
Alex
C5A Mk1|C65 316L LE|C63 36mm, GMT, Elite, 2023ish FLE|C1 Moonglow|Omega Seamaster DeVille|Speedmaster mk40|Speedmaster Racing|MoonSwatch Mercury|RZE Endeavor|Tudor BB58 925
User avatar
jkbarnes
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 7822
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:39 pm
CW-watches: 3
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by jkbarnes »

We had a French teacher in my building with a crazy strong southern accent, and it absolutely came through in her spoken French. Now, I don’t speak French, but I cringed every time I walked past her classroom. Her kids would be lost speaking French in France.

My college roommate was a Spanish major. He knew he’d never sound like a native Spanish speaker, so his goal was to at least not sound American. He was thrilled when a Spaniard asked him if he was from Canada.

Final thought, I was talking with my wife about our parents’ accents (Massachusetts for her parents, NY for mine). She commented that while I have not inherited from my parents any hint of a NY accent, she said I absolutely speak with “New York energy.” Interesting.
Drew
User avatar
missF
CW Forum Poet Laureate
CW Forum Poet Laureate
Posts: 11701
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:59 pm
CW-watches: 3
Location: Edinburgh

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by missF »

ajax87 wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 3:01 pm but I did find someone speaking Japanese with a Scottish accent. So there you go. https://fb.watch/mkFNU_crZG/
Brilliant! Also hilarious that the phrases people always associate with the Scottish accent include ‘haud yer wheesht’ or anything involving baw bags :lol:
These users thanked the author missF for the post:
ajax87
User avatar
iain
Trusted Seller
Trusted Seller
Posts: 3045
Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2015 3:13 pm
CW-watches: 1

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by iain »

jkbarnes wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 3:31 pm He was thrilled when a Spaniard asked him if he was from Canada.
This is probably a cross over to the offensive regional names thread.

I quickly learned when working overseas how to not offend our antipodean friends or those from the North American continent.

If I asked a Canadian if he was American they were almost always offended. Whereas asking an American if they were Canadian didn’t provoke the same level of ire.

The same was true if I asked someone from NZ if they were Australian. They would nearly always be offended but less so the other way round.

When I say offended, it was more often a light hearted offence but it certainly touched a nerve.

So if in doubt when I heard a North American or Australasian accent. The safest question was “Are you Canadian / Kiwi?”
These users thanked the author iain for the post (total 2):
jkbarnesmissF
Iain’s Law: Any discussion on the Christopher Ward forum, irrespective of the thread title or subject matter, will eventually lead to someone mentioning the Bel Canto if the thread continues for long enough.
User avatar
jkbarnes
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 7822
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:39 pm
CW-watches: 3
Location: Virginia, USA

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by jkbarnes »

iain wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 4:13 pm
jkbarnes wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 3:31 pm He was thrilled when a Spaniard asked him if he was from Canada.
This is probably a cross over to the offensive regional names thread.

I quickly learned when working overseas how to not offend our antipodean friends or those from the North American continent.

If I asked a Canadian if he was American they were almost always offended. Whereas asking an American if they were Canadian didn’t provoke the same level of ire.

The same was true if I asked someone from NZ if they were Australian. They would nearly always be offended but less so the other way round.

When I say offended, it was more often a light hearted offence but it certainly touched a nerve.

So if I’m doubt when I heard a North American or Australasian accent. The safest question was “Are you Canadian / Kiwi?”
That’s pretty fascinating, and I totally understand it. I’d never be offended for being mistaken for Canadian. I’d also probably never be mistaken for Canadian! :lol:

The more I think about it, it might have been that someone asked if he was British, not Canadian. And for my roommate, it wasn’t about not wanting to be recognized as American, it’s was purely about shedding the non-native speaker accent. He new he’d never sound like a Spaniard, so he settled for at least not sounding American. He was obsessive about his Spanish.
Drew
User avatar
NigelS
Expert
Expert
Posts: 202
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2023 8:02 am
CW-watches: 2
Location: Stone, Staffs, UK

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by NigelS »

Amor Vincit Omnia wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 8:31 am I can’t help wishing he had looked at the Potteries dialect, which I grew up with thanks mainly to my grandfather. You can hear the accent if you listen to someone like Garth Crooks or Robbie Williams, but the dialect (dying out somewhat these days) is quite impenetrable. It has elements of Shakespearean English and workplace slang from the pottery industry.
Yea, yea - you left out a bit, we eat a lot of chips :lol:
'Life is Art, and not otherwise' C.S.Lewis
User avatar
Amor Vincit Omnia
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 33604
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2011 7:34 pm
CW-watches: 4
Location: Norfolk, UK

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

^^^ Vocabulary, pronunciation, syntax, grammar…

…food. Of course, how remiss of me. :oops:
Steve
Linguist; retired teacher; pilgrim; apprentice travel writer

Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints, kill nothing but time


Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. (Max Ehrmann)
User avatar
gwells
Senior Forumgod
Senior Forumgod
Posts: 7626
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 4:02 am
CW-watches: 1
Location: falls church, va

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by gwells »

yes, but if you offend a canadian by asking if they're american, they'll also apologize for being offended ;)
These users thanked the author gwells for the post:
ajax87
the "g" is for Greg...
User avatar
Amor Vincit Omnia
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 33604
Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2011 7:34 pm
CW-watches: 4
Location: Norfolk, UK

Re: 11 Difficult English Accents

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

iain wrote: Thu Aug 10, 2023 4:13 pm The same was true if I asked someone from NZ if they were Australian. They would nearly always be offended but less so the other way round.

When I say offended, it was more often a light hearted offence but it certainly touched a nerve.

So if in doubt when I heard a North American or Australasian accent. The safest question was “Are you Canadian / Kiwi?”
This is actually pretty good as far as Australian versus New Zealand is concerned. A lot of the difference is in the short vowels. Navigate to 5 minutes 40 seconds.

The standard joke is about New Zealanders saying “Fush and chups”, as opposed to the Australian “Feesh and cheeps”. It’s not quite that obvious, but there’s certainly a difference and that is one of the main ways to tell (short E and short I). Kiwis will have a “luddle bit” (little bet) on the horses. Ask a Kiwi to tell you he is offended, and he will probably pronounce it a bit like “offindud”.


These users thanked the author Amor Vincit Omnia for the post:
iain
Steve
Linguist; retired teacher; pilgrim; apprentice travel writer

Take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints, kill nothing but time


Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. (Max Ehrmann)
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post