Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

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Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Internaut »

How many turns of the crown for a full power reserve? Does this movement guard against overwinding?
Watches? Beat up Swatch Irony I bought in the 90s, C5 Malvern (the original), Swiss Military Swiss Soldier Quartz, Seagull 1963, Swatch Blurang, CW Sealander GMT, Motorola 360 (broke), Huawei Sports 2 (broke), Fitbit Charge 5. Festina 8810.
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Amor Vincit Omnia
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

Internaut wrote: Thu May 12, 2022 9:47 am How many turns of the crown for a full power reserve? Does this movement guard against overwinding?
Like all automatics, the SW330-2 is fitted with a clutch. Once full power reserve is achieved the rotor continues to turn when you move your wrist, but the clutch detaches it from the winding mechanism. You cannot overwind it.

For hand winding purposes to get it going, they suggest 10 to 20 turns. If starting up from stopped, I tend to give my automatics a few turns until I see the seconds hand has started to move. Then I put it on. Isaac Newton does the rest. Magic. :D

I might also give it a few turns if I think it is near the end of the PR, though the way I wear my watches (same one for several days in a row) tends to preclude that.
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Internaut »

Thank you. For the first question, I just did a quick second RTFM and that does say twenty times. I'm thinking in terms of my wearing patterns which will, I think, typically be Monday to Friday for the CW and then one of my other watches for the weekend. I'm thinking it probably makes sense to give the CW a quick wind Saturday and Sunday mornings so it is already working when I put it on my wrist on Monday morning (when I'm pushed for time and setting a watch will be one more thing).
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Watches? Beat up Swatch Irony I bought in the 90s, C5 Malvern (the original), Swiss Military Swiss Soldier Quartz, Seagull 1963, Swatch Blurang, CW Sealander GMT, Motorola 360 (broke), Huawei Sports 2 (broke), Fitbit Charge 5. Festina 8810.
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

RTFM is always a good idea, but one hesitates to suggest it in those terms. :lol:

An alternative to your suggested pattern is to invest in a watch winder. They are silent, don’t use a lot of juice and keep your watch nicely wound if you are not wearing it for a few days.

Of course, if your collection grows your needs and habits may well change with it. I tend to wear the same watch for several days, or even a week or more, and then it has a spell in the box. and now that I’m retired the distinction between work watches and others has become somewhat blurred.
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Internaut »

Amor Vincit Omnia wrote: Thu May 12, 2022 10:55 am RTFM is always a good idea, but one hesitates to suggest it in those terms. :lol:

An alternative to your suggested pattern is to invest in a watch winder. They are silent, don’t use a lot of juice and keep your watch nicely wound if you are not wearing it for a few days.

Of course, if your collection grows your needs and habits may well change with it. I tend to wear the same watch for several days, or even a week or more, and then it has a spell in the box. and now that I’m retired the distinction between work watches and others has become somewhat blurred.
Well, watch winder is an entirely new concept for me, and a well reviewed one, on Amazon, isn't expensive. I've just ordered one. I might also get one for my old C5 Malvern (which is somewhat lacking as far as power reserve goes).
Watches? Beat up Swatch Irony I bought in the 90s, C5 Malvern (the original), Swiss Military Swiss Soldier Quartz, Seagull 1963, Swatch Blurang, CW Sealander GMT, Motorola 360 (broke), Huawei Sports 2 (broke), Fitbit Charge 5. Festina 8810.
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

I used to have one but I found that it wasn’t really necessary given the way I wear my watches. It now lives with another forum member.

Interesting comment about the old C5. Mind dates from 2009 and certainly has the smallest power reserve of any of my automatics.
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Re: Quick questions about hand winding my Sealander GMT

Post by rkovars »

Hopefully you grabbed one of these. They have a very high quality Japanese motor that is nearly silent. It also works on AA batteries so you don't have to have it plugged in. I have two sets of rechargeables that I switch out every two weeks or so.

Be sure to set the settings correctly for the movement. Recommended for the SW330-2 is 650-800 turns per day bi-directional winding - start at the low end and see how it goes. The bi-directional part is that the rotor winds in both directions. The winder will turn in both directions equally so that wear doesn't occur in one direction.

They recommend 20 turns on the wind to get you to the center of the power reserve. A full wind is somewhere around 45 full turns of the crown. If you are an accuracy nut giving it 20 turns is probably good as winding it until it starts running leaves you at the low end of the power reserve where a watch is generally the least accurate. Because of the gear ratios it takes many more turns of the rotor to fully wind the watch (anywhere from 1000 to 1300 or so depending on the movement). Depending on your activity level it can be a really long time before you get to a full wind.

You can check about how many turns by fully winding the watch. It won't hurt anything if you don't make a habit of it. When you get to full power you will physically hear the clutch engage with a clicking sound. At that point it is fully wound.

Just looked up the number of turns for a full wind on the SW330 family and it looks like 65 full crown turns. Given that number I would give it about 30 from a dead stop.

Also, all of these are general numbers. Every movement is different and I have some that require a bit more or a bit less depending. It is a trial and error thing.
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