Question from a new automatic owner

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swm
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Question from a new automatic owner

Post by swm »

Hi all

I have a question regarding my recent purchase of my first automatic watch, a c60 gmt.

I received it Thursday and gave it a quick wind to get it started and set the time. I only wore it for a few hours and when I came home from work on Friday, can't wear a watch at work, it had stopped. Rewound, reset and again wore it for the evening.

The watch was left on my bedside cabinet, on it's side, but in the morning it had lost about 3 hours but was still running. Again rewound, reset and wore the watch all day yesterday but when I picked the watch up this morning it had stopped. This time it had been sitting in it's box.

Am I missing a trick here? How long would you have to wear it to get it fully wound and with some power reserve to take it through a night and probably the daytime during the week?

Thanks

Stuart
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ianblyth
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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by ianblyth »

Hi Stuart,

congrats on the watch. To fully wind an automatic using the crown takes about 40 turns. Wearing it can take from a few hours to all day depending on how active you are. Once fully wound an automatic will then run for 38 to 42 hours. The way to test it is to give it at least 40 turns (you can not over-wind it as the gear will just slip when fully wound) and leave and see how long it lasts before it stops. If it is in the 38 to 42 hour range it is working fine.

Once that is done try wearing it all day when you are not at work and see if that works OK. I once had an automatic that wound and ran fine but the rotor was not powering up the watch so it would run down when wearing it or when it was on a winder. If in the unlikely event that is the case then just follow the instructions on the web to return it for repair. CWL customer service is very good.
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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by Kip »

Try Ians suggestion first.

You may be a good candidate for a winder if you don't like winding the watch.
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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by Russ-Shettle »

Kip wrote:Try Ians suggestion first.

You may be a good candidate for a winder if you don't like winding the watch.
This is the first time I agree to the idea of buying a winder. As another suggestion, not to replace getting a winder idea, wear your watch to bed! I have never had an auto stop as long as I wore it. My activity apparently give it full reserve and I don't consider myself all that active. In fact, I often take my watch off for short spells of 1 to several hours for various reason usually having to do with protection of the watch itself. Still, never had one stop. I've changed to different autos before only to fine the one I wearing before still running after a day and a half.

Curious as to why you can't wear it to work? I was a electronics tech in the Air Force. We were not supposed to wear any jewelry, wedding rings included, due to the electrical shock hazard. Some of the guys would wear a wide stretchy band over their watch to shield it from contact. That work well so they could continue to wear a watch.

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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by swm »

Since wearing it all day Sunday it was still ticking again Monday evening when I got home from work. I shall wear it each evening but it looks fine now.

As for not wearing it at work it's to comply with food hygiene rules about no jewellery being worn on the production floor.

Might invest in a watch winder soon to ensure it's ready at all times.

Thanks for the input.
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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by f1colin »

swm wrote:Since wearing it all day Sunday it was still ticking again Monday evening when I got home from work. I shall wear it each evening but it looks fine now.

As for not wearing it at work it's to comply with food hygiene rules about no jewellery being worn on the production floor.

Might invest in a watch winder soon to ensure it's ready at all times.

Thanks for the input.
Might like to consider a multi winder...? Good to future proof if you think you might expand your collection with some more! The chap i bought mine from in 2007 was the guy who pointed me in the direction of CW for the first time :clap: :clap:
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Re: Question from a new automatic owner

Post by Russ-Shettle »

I'm glad your watch proved to be OK. In your situation of not being able to wear it all the time to keep the movement wound up, it almost sounds like a manual wind-up watch would be the thing versus going with a quartz movement as the other alternative however, you might, just might get away with wearing it in the evening and throughout the night and see that it's still ticking when you get home from work.

Do employees at where you work have lockers? or someplace you can lock up valuables to be safe from theft? That may be risky but it would render the greatest power reserve. Another idea, if you drive to work and back, is to lock it up in the glove compartment of your car unless you don't feel comfortable with that idea. But if you do and you feel that your work-place is relatively secure, this would also maximize power reserve. The longer you keep your watch on the wrist the more reserve it will accumulate.

The fun thing to try might be to just to see what it will do by wearing it at home for as long as you can before leaving for work the next day. This is why I suggest wearing it to bed. Leave it on while getting dressed and getting yourself prepared for work. A lot of arm action take place while getting yourself ready for anything. Take it off only at the last second before you leave out the door. You might be surprised to find that it keeps running for you. It's a automatic and they require you to wear them. What more can I say?

Try that experiment. I would love to know the results and if the results are in you favor, this is the kind of thing guests look for from a Forum, what they can learn about watches and movements they have no experience with. Most, unlike myself, didn't grow up with mechanical only watches. Your auto is a "pure" mechanical and pure mechanical's, despite the age of electronics, is still the most expensive and the most endeared watch type in the world because it's root date back several centuries.

Rus