Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

Discuss Christopher Ward watches
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

Post by artphotodude »

jkbarnes wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 3:38 pm
Thegreyman wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:20 am I think it works with a vintage leather style strap on certain watches with a retro look. I have one on my blue alcantara Martu strap worn with the BB58 blue. Not sure they would work with more of a dress watch though.
My thoughts, exactly. It works on the right strap with the right watch. I have a Tiber strap that looks great on my vintage inspired Seiko diver, but I wouldn’t dream of putting it on my C65 AMGT LE. In much the same way, I wouldn’t put a rally strap on a diver.


D1F20707-040F-4364-8C3A-492810EEF6B1.jpeg
That's a lovely watch, but the white stitching reminds me (a bit) of tape or a bandaid holding someone's glasses together. It seems like it would be better with a metal crimp if that's the idea, that matches the buckle - just my 2 Kopeks.
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

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0uatiOW wrote: Thu Nov 25, 2021 11:35 pm I always associate the side stitch with vintage straps, and I like the added detail. Otherwise it’s just a strap.
The funny thing is, unless I'm wrong, this is a very modern trend. I'm nearly 50, and don't recall ever seeing that kind of stitching when I was a kid. The only stitching then was lengthwise. If someone can show I'm mistaken about this, please do. Sort of like how Sepia Toning in Photography was always intended to look old-fashioned, but never actually had any relation to any vintage photo printing process, or who Middle English in the Bible was kinda' arbitrary when it was used in King James times. These feel like 'synthetic' vintage.
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

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And don't even get me started on the freaky stitching on a lot of Stingray Straps - who thinks this looks good? :shock:
Like buying a 20GB software package and having a 40GB day-1 patch (unacceptable) - I.M.O.
Maybe using a sweater serger isn't the best tool for fine leather working.
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

Post by jkbarnes »

artphotodude wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 12:29 am It seems like it would be better with a metal crimp if that's the idea, that matches the buckle - just my 2 Kopeks.
I think that would look odd, way worse than the stitching. Different strokes for different folks….
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

Post by Amor Vincit Omnia »

artphotodude wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 12:32 am Sort of like how Sepia Toning in Photography was always intended to look old-fashioned, but never actually had any relation to any vintage photo printing process, or who Middle English in the Bible was kinda' arbitrary when it was used in King James times. These feel like 'synthetic' vintage.
An interesting point. I will take your word for it as far as Sepia Toning is concerned. You are certainly right concerning the King James Bible, as by the early 17th century English (Early Modern, perhaps, as opposed to Middle English) was far from being formalised and standardised in its grammar and spelling. It might surprise a lot of people to know that when they read or hear extracts from the Authorised Version, they are actually looking at or hearing the results of several revisions that took place over more than 150 years, culminating in the revision of 1769; in other words an 18th-century attempt to iron out the inconsistencies of the original. The actual text of the 1611 version looks rather different.

I apologise for repeating myself, but I have said this before about what you call a synthetic vintage. If you want a watch that looks like an old watch, buy an old watch. However, I don’t know enough about straps to know whether that aphorism would apply or not.

Postscript: I should probably also add that I find the stingray strap in the picture pretty revolting. Not so much the stitching but the strap material itself.
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

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Amor Vincit Omnia wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 9:55 am
artphotodude wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 12:32 am Sort of like how Sepia Toning in Photography was always intended to look old-fashioned, but never actually had any relation to any vintage photo printing process, or who Middle English in the Bible was kinda' arbitrary when it was used in King James times. These feel like 'synthetic' vintage.
An interesting point. I will take your word for it as far as Sepia Toning is concerned. You are certainly right concerning the King James Bible, as by the early 17th century English (Early Modern, perhaps, as opposed to Middle English) was far from being formalised and standardised in its grammar and spelling. It might surprise a lot of people to know that when they read or hear extracts from the Authorised Version, they are actually looking at or hearing the results of several revisions that took place over more than 150 years, culminating in the revision of 1769; in other words an 18th-century attempt to iron out the inconsistencies of the original. The actual text of the 1611 version looks rather different.

I apologise for repeating myself, but I have said this before about what you call a synthetic vintage. If you want a watch that looks like an old watch, buy an old watch. However, I don’t know enough about straps to know whether that aphorism would apply or not.

Postscript: I should probably also add that I find the stingray strap in the picture pretty revolting. Not so much the stitching but the strap material itself.
As for Sepia toning, there is a notion that things "turn brown" as they age, but in reality, silver-based film actually fades and gets lighter (often with slightly purplish/pinkish tarnish, like on real silver-forks and spoons. I remember reading a health guide at one job advising that all "White" carbs were processed and less healthy, and now we know in some cases (white Rice -which isn't bleached but is a different species), that brown grains often contain lectins that are actually kinda toxic.

I love how the economist Steve Keen talks about this in a lot of human thought. Answer's to complex things that are "Neat, plausible and wrong". :D

As for Vintage watches, it seems somewhat arbitrary to me to have things like this cross-stitching, but it seems like a lot of people like it. So different strokes.
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Re: Lug-Stitching on Leather Straps - Yay or Nay?

Post by JAFO »

I feel that the lug stitches tend to be seen more on less "finished" straps.

ie, a dressy lined padded leather strap with carefully closed edges, and with or without complete selfcoloured edge stitching isn't the sort of candidate for these lug stitches.

I thought I only had two straps with lug stitches, but I actually have only 1. That's a CW Tiber, a thicker utilitarian strap, rather than a dress strap. The other one I thought I had was a Watchgecko four oaks, but it actually has 3 stitches across the centre of the strap end, where the lug stitches would be. Sort of similar style finish, and again not really a dress strap.
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